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New Optical Laser Can Increase DVD Storage Up To One Peta Byte

The technology world seems to be moving fast and it seems as if there has been rapid switch off choice from optical media to digital downloads. The way things are going there is no hesitation in saying that DVDs are old stock. By far only Blue Rays are withstanding the new technology wave. Thanks a million to the gaming industry. As technology influx has affected every bit of the world and same is the case with optical media. Scientists have made a new type of optical laser that will boost the storage capacity of a single DVD from 4.7GB to 1 petabyte. No change in size or shape will occur only the laser will be changed that reads data on the DVD. This could bring a dramatic increase of technology respect of DVDs in customer eyes and could definitely bring the DVDs back in daily usage.

The reasons are necessary to understand that hold the current condition of the consumer market for storage devices. As we mentioned earlier normal DVD can store data up to 4.7GB, and a dual layer can store double the storage capacity of the single layer DVD. A blue Ray can store up to 25GB of data and again if its dual layer another 25GB can be added to the total. This clearly explains why Blue Ray DVDs were able to withstand the technology wave. PS3 has the player that runs Blue Ray but its sole reason is to serve gaming purpose. So, the PS3 player does not act as a Blue Ray writer. And honestly how many of us would buy PS3 just to run Blue Rays? In todays world hard drives storage capacity is stalling around multiple terabytes. On the other hand SSDs are sitting around 1TB mark. Everyone knows how expensive hard drives can be in terms of cost. If this new laser technology does what it claims then no doubt optical media can give tough time to small and big storage units in the market. It is expected that optical media will take back their fair share in the market.

The Research analysts made use of a standard laser to write data. Now the plan was to limit the abilities of the first beam so, they positioned a round but hollow at the centre shaped laser around the first beam. This surly decreased the diameter of the first beam which allowed the laser to write smaller storage packs on the disc. Give or take one-ten-thousandth the size of a human hair. The process is ideal, portable and cheap. Standard optical and laser equipment is all you need to get it going.

 This side of the story makes it very practical for the future and when the costs are low chances are someone will take big steps to implement it. The team has not yet given a clear time if the idea could be marketed. The way the team amazingly increased single DVD storage capacity with conventional and low cost equipment there is no doubt in peoples mind that this idea is very deserving in terms of gaining attention of consumer market.